“British businesses are drowning in EU red tape”

Not true. When we get it right, EU legislation is an exercise in cutting red tape! After all, we need common rules for the common market to protect workers, consumers and the environment. When we replace 28 divergent sets of national rules with a single set of pan-European rules, we can cut duplication and compliance costs. Just one example: it’s now possible to register a trademark once, valid across 28 countries, instead of having to do 28 different sets of form-filling, registering, troubleshooting and fee-paying. Evidence EU technical standards are generally drafted and agreed by the industry themselves. This means that most standards are based on the national regulations that they replace, rather than brand new requirements. Of course, we would need those rules anyway, but sharing them across the entire market means businesses only have to work to one set of standards rather than 28.Evidence Simplifying the compliance framework for businesses in particular has been a major priority of the European Commission in recent years. The REFIT programme is a rolling scheme to evaluate, simplify and repeal rules. Evidence


          	

“British businesses are clamouring for us to leave the EU”

Not true. You wouldn’t believe it from the eurosceptic rhetoric, but in fact, both British businesses and inward investors have been emphatic that Britain must stay in!
  • 85% of British manufacturers want us to remain in the EU, according to a 2014 survey by the British manufacturers’ association EEF. The association represents 600,000 companies of all sizes. Evidence
  • Small businesses support EU membership. The Federation of Small Businesses argued in 2014 that the EU is good for business, and 20% of its members trade overseas. Evidence
  • The Confederation of British Industry is a strong advocate for EU membership. British industry argues that “the benefits significantly outweigh the costs” and that it’s vital to our global competitiveness that we stay a member. Evidence
  • The head of the UK government’s export credit guarantee agency reports EU membership is “critical” for exporting around the world. Evidence
  • British Chambers of Commerce members overwhelmingly want the UK to stay in the EU, and think withdrawal would have “a bad impact on their future”. Evidence
  • Members of the Institute of Directors strongly support EU membership, with members voting more than three to one against UK exit in 2013. Evidence
  • An independent poll of the top 500 British businesses in 2015 found that only 1% of boardroom bosses wanted to leave the EU. Evidence
  • The financial sector in the City of London thinks that EU membership is an “enormous benefit”. Evidence
  • A group of top free-market economists pointed out in 2014 that UK withdrawal from the EU would be a “grave threat” and would cause foreign investment to dry up. Evidence